Public Programs

Reel to Real Films: Watermark

Thursday, September 25
7:00 pm
$10 Advance / $12 Door / $5 Students & Teachers
Purchase Tickets

Watermark is a feature documentary from multiple-award winning filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nick de Pencier, and renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky, marking their second collaboration after Manufactured Landscapes in 2006. The film brings together diverse stories from around the globe about our relationship with water: how we are drawn to it, what we learn from it, how we use it and the consequences of that use. We see massive floating abalone farms off China’s Fujian coast and the construction site of the biggest arch dam in the world – the Xiluodu, six times the size of the Hoover. We visit the barren desert delta where the mighty Colorado River no longer reaches the ocean, and the water-intensive leather tanneries of Dhaka.We witness how humans are drawn to water, from the U.S. Open of Surfing in Huntington Beach to the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, where thirty million people gather for a sacred bath in the Ganges at the same time. We speak with scientists who drill ice cores two kilometers deep into the Greenland Ice Sheet, and explore the sublime pristine watershed of Northern British Columbia.

>>Learn more 

 

 

 

 

Maya Lin Lecture

Monday, September 29
7:30 pm, doors open at 7:00 pm
Free, $10 suggested donation
RSVP closed

Maya Lin’s work encompasses large-scale environmental installations, intimate studio artworks, architectural works, and memorials. She will discuss her body of work focused on a profound respect and love for the natural environment along with her final memorial, the What is Missing? project, which asks viewers to reconsider nature and the environment at a time when it is crucial to do so. The talk will be followed by a short Q&A and attendees will be invited to add their own environmental memories to the What is Missing? archive in the Brower Center gallery.

The RSVP list for this event is now closed. RSVP's will be admitted on a first-come, first-served basis, and not everyone who RSVP'd will be able to attend the lecture. Please arrive early to guarantee seating.

>>Learn more 

 

 

Clark Kerr Lectures on the Role of Higher Education in Society

Presented by the Center for Studies in Higher Education

Tuesday September 30
4:00-7:00pm
Free

The Clark Kerr Lectures series honors Clark Kerr, president of the University of California from 1958 to 1967 and long recognized as one of the great leaders of American higher education in the twentieth century. The 2014 Clark Kerr Lecturer is Simon Marginson, Professor of International Higher Education at the University of London. The first lecture, on September 30, takes as its topic "Clark Kerr Multiversity."

>> Learn More

 

 

2014 Seacology Prize Ceremony

Presented by Seacology

Tuesday, October 9
6:00-9:00pm

Free; RSVP required

Each year, Seacology awards the Seacology Prize to an indigenous islander for exceptional achievement in preserving the environment and culture of his or her home island. Winners receive $10,000 and are brought to the United States for an award ceremony in October. The 2014 Seacology Prize Winner is Ali Shaibu Shekue.

The Seacology Prize is underwritten by Seacology's President Ken Murdock, in honor of his mother, Lalovi Fish Murdock.

>>RSVP

 

 

Into the Wilderness

Presented by Litquake

Monday, October 13
6:30 pm
Free

The Wilderness Act celebrates its 50th anniversary this fall. While nature needs protection now more than ever, the means for attaining it remain problematic, cutting to the heart of how we live. The evening's presentation features four esteemed writers who investigate diverse dimensions of wilderness and its discontents. Expect new information as well as fresh perspectives. Featuring Peter Alagona, Tony Barnosky, Mary Ellen Hannibal and Nathan Sayer.

>> Learn more

 

 

Reel to Real Films: Lost Rivers

Tuesday, October 21
7:00 pm
$10 Advance / $12 Door / $5 Students & Teachers
Purchase Tickets

Lost Rivers tells the story of the water flowing just beneath the feet of urban and suburban dwellers. Once upon a time, in almost every industrial city, countless rivers flowed. We built houses along their banks. Our roads hugged their curves. And their currents fed our mills and factories. But as cities grew, we polluted rivers so much that they became conduits for deadly waterborne diseases like cholera, which killed hundreds of thousands throughout the 19th century. Our solution two centuries ago was to bury rivers underground and merge them with sewer networks. Today, under the city, they still flow, out of sight and out of mind… until now. 

>>Learn more 

 

 

Water Fights: California Water Bond

Presented in partnership with Restore Hetch Hetchy
Thursday, October 23
7:00 pm
Free, $10 suggested donation
RSVP

The controversial 2014 California Water Bond will allow the state government to borrow $7.5 billion to overhaul our water system. To educate voters about this complex measure, currently on track for the November ballot, the Brower Center has gathered a prestigious group of experts supporting and opposing the bond. Allocations include funds for water storage projects, ecosystem protection, groundwater protection, and technology solutions such as desalination – all of which draw passionate supporters and detractors. The evening will feature conversations representing a wide variety of viewpoints, including Central Valley farmer Stuart Woolf, the Pacific Institute’s Peter Gleick, and former Deputy Secretary of the California Natural Resource Agency and top water advisor to Governor Jerry Brown, Jerry Meral. The evening will be moderated by Dave Sunding of the UC Berkeley College of Natural Resources.

>>Learn more 

 

 

Water Fights: California Water Conflicts

Presented in partnership with Restore Hetch Hetchy
Wednesday, November 5
7:00 pm
Free, $10 suggested donation
RSVP

Part two of the Brower Center’s water-themed series focuses on past and present water debates in California, which has been called “the most hydrologically altered landmass on the planet.”  In November, the Center will take a look at California’s water history, exploring the successes and failures of major water redistribution projects: Mono Lake, San Joaquin River, the Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct, and others. Special guests will include Spreck Rosekrans with Restore Hetch Hetchy, Michael Carlin with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commision, Martha Davis and Geoff McQuilkin with MonoLake.org, Monty Schmitt with the Natural Resources Defense Council, and representatives from the Friant Water Authority. 

>>Learn more 

 

 

What is Missing?: An Evening of Beauty & Delusion with Heyday Books

Wednesday, January 14
7:00 pm
Free, $10 suggested donation
RSVP

Join us in celebrating the addition of a Bay Area “wormhole” to Maya Lin's What is Missing? project with a reception with Heyday Books’ Malcolm Margolin and other contributors. The evening will include a presentation of Heyday’s environmental history findings, as well as a discussion on how Bay Area ecosystems are continuing to be affected by climate change and human interventions.

>>Learn more